If You Aren’t Doing This One Thing, Your Workouts May Not Be As Effective

Everybody knows the importance of exercising on a regular basis. You don’t need us to remind you. But if you’re not eliminating this one key ingredient from your life, you may not be reaping the full benefits of those endless hours in the gym. The enemy? Big Bad Sugar.

The research studies and reports are staggering: sugar is undeniably linked to many health issues, including increased risk of diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and stroke. Sugar is made up of glucose and fructose. Fructose is metabolized in the liver and when the liver gets flooded with too much of it, it gets converted to fat, which eventually spills into the bloodstream. It also never really allows you to feel full; instead, it activates your brain’s reward center, making you feel good and wanting more. Bad, bad, bad!

There is a silver lining.  Cutting out sugar from your diet has almost immediate positive effects. According to a recent study, 43 children reduced their daily sugar intake from 28% to 10%. And in just 10 days, the children’s triglycerides levels, LDL cholesterol, blood pressure, and risk of diabetes all decreased. That’s pretty compelling.

Reducing added sugar from your diet can be simpler than you think. Read food labels, don’t add extra sugar to your tea or coffee, replace soda with water, buy products without added sugar, and make sure you’re eating properly and often. Check out more tips from Health.com, and Reader’s Digest.

Looking for low sugar solutions? Zumba Shake Shake Shake™ has only 1 gram of sugar or less. Visit ZumbaShake.com to find recipes and more!

Anastasia Conover graduated from West Chester University with a bachelor’s degree in Nutrition and Dietetics. She continued her education receiving a Master’s degree in Clinical Nutrition from New York University. Now she teaches nutrition classes, does nutrition counseling, and develops healthy recipes and diets to help people reach their health and wellness goals. She also devotes her time to community outreach focusing on kidney disease education.

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